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September 14, 2017

Inside HFES

New HFES Executive Council Members Elected

HFES 2017 Salary and Compensation Survey Results

Submissions for EID Special Issue on Sonic Information Design Due October 1

Abbott Laboratories and Hill-Rom to Receive 2017 User-Centered Product Design Award

Public Policy Matters

Congress Passes Continuing Resolution to Avoid Government Shutdown
By Lewis-Burke Associates LLC

Annual Meeting

Hurricanes Not Affecting Annual Meeting

Keynote Address: Policing Reform Versus Police Reform

PDTG Invited Speaker to Address Trust in Artificial Intelligence

Hot-Topic Plenary Session Recap

Book Your Room by September 19 and Save

RSVP for the Women's Mentoring and Networking Lunch
By Ashley Hughes, University of Illinois at Chicago; Beth Blickensderfer, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University; Gabriella M. Hancock, California State University, Long Beach; Tracy Sanders, MITRE Corporation; and Nadia Doutcheva, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Join the Discussion on the Future of the Women's Group
By Ashley Hughes, University of Illinois at Chicago; Beth Blickensderfer, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University; Gabriella M. Hancock, California State University, Long Beach; Tracy Sanders, MITRE Corporation; and Nadia Doutcheva, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Other News

Request for Proposals: APA Interdisciplinary Conference
 


 

Inside HFES

New HFES Executive Council Members Elected

HFES is pleased to announce the results of the 2017 election and congratulates the following newly elected Executive Council members. Their terms will begin at the 2017 HFES Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas.


President-Elect
Kermit G. Davis, University of Cincinnati


Secretary-Treasurer-Elect
Christopher R. Reid, Boeing Company


At-Large Executive Council Members
Ellen Bass, Drexel University
Richard J. Holden, Indiana University
 

 
 

Inside HFES

HFES 2017 Salary and Compensation Survey Results

The 2017 HFES Salary and Compensation Survey Report is now available. HFES has conducted salary surveys of its members several times over the years, most recently this May. We once again contracted with PRM Consulting, Inc., a professional services consulting firm headquartered in Washington, D.C., to develop an easy-to-complete online questionnaire consisting of yes/no and multiple-choice questions.


The report contains the results, in tabular form, from members in the United States based on their 2016 employment and consulting income. A total of 418 members in the categories of Fellow, Full Member, and Associate Member fully completed the survey questionnaire, representing a response rate of 22%.


Responses cover pay (cash and nonmonetary compensation) and benefits such as health insurance or defined contribution plans. In addition, the questionnaire included questions about current trends in the employment environment for HF/E professionals. In 16 tables, the report describes members' demographic data (region, market sector, degree held/discipline, degree/years of experience, years since highest degree, population, and employment size), as well as mean total pay by those same characteristics.

 

Summary tables include the following:
  • Profile of Survey Respondents by Region, Market Sector, Degree and Total Experience, and Market Size

  • Total Pay Summary Statistics by Region

  • Contract Earnings Summary Statistics by Market Sector

  • Mean and Median Total Pay by Region and Highest Degree Earned

  • Mean and Median Total Pay by Region and Years of Experience

  • Summary of Total Pay by Experience (Employees and Consultants)

  • Mean and Median Other Cash by Market Sector

  • Summary of Benefits by Market Sector

In compliance with federal antitrust regulations and to ensure anonymity and lack of bias, this survey was conducted through an independent survey consultant. The report is priced to recover direct costs.


Respondent Characteristics
There is a fairly even distribution of survey respondents across the United States, with the largest percentage located in California and the East Central region, which includes Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio.


Nearly half of all survey respondents (48.8%) are employed in the for-profit business sector. Approximately 27% of survey respondents are employed in a university setting.

55% of survey respondents have a PhD in psychology or engineering. Overall, HF/E professionals with a doctorate earn 9% to 13% more than their counterparts with a master's degree in terms of base salary.


On average, survey respondents have been in their current position for approximately 18 years. More than 62% of all survey respondents work at an organization with 1,500 or more employees.


Pay Data
Overall, average employee base salaries are highest in the Southwest ($146,759) and Northeast ($131,514) regions. Across the other surveyed regions, average base salaries ranged from a low of $108,381 in the East Central region to a high of $126,208 in New England.


Employee Benefits
The full report provides a detailed summary of various benefits reported by survey respondents. The benefits data reflect information reported for employees with W-2 earnings only.


Most survey respondents (approximately 90%) receive employer-provided health benefits, including dental and vision. Employees within a university setting pay less for their health benefits than do their counterparts in all other market sectors.

Well over half of survey respondents can receive tuition assistance (62%) and support for attendance at professional meetings and conferences (77%), but only about half of them (54%) can be reimbursed for professional society dues.


The full report may be purchased online. Survey respondents received a free copy, and the report is available for $50 for HFES members and $200 for nonmembers.
 

 
 

Inside HFES

Submissions for EID Special Issue on Sonic Information Design Due October 1

Submissions are invited for a special issue, tentatively scheduled for publication in mid-2018, on sonic information design. The due date for submissions is October 1, 2017. Long feature articles should be between 1,500 and 3,000 words, and shorter articles should be limited to between 1,000 and 1,500 words. Decision letters will be sent in November 2017, and revised manuscripts will be due January 2018. The special issue is scheduled for publication in summer 2018. For more information, see the March Bulletin article.


The issue will be promoted not only to the HF/E community, including researchers and practitioners, but also to auditory displays and sonification communities outside the HF/E field. Accepted articles will reach a large and diverse readership in an attractive, well-respected, peer-reviewed publication.


View the instructions for authors, publication policies, and sample articles, and then submit your article via the EID online submission site.
 

 
 

Inside HFES

Abbott Laboratories and Hill-Rom to Receive 2017 User-Centered Product Design Award

The recipients of the 2017 HFES Product Design Technical Group Stanley H. Caplan User-Centered Product Design Award are Abbott Laboratories for Alinity ci-series Diagnostic Systems and Hill-Rom for Centrella. The award emphasizes innovative and user-centered approaches to HF/E and industrial design.


The award will be presented at a special session at the HFES 2017 International Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas, on Tuesday, October 10. During the award session, recipients will discuss their design methodologies and successes and challenges in developing the devices.


Alinity ci-series Diagnostic Systems is an integrated clinical chemistry and immunoassay system for hospital and independent labs that detects the presence of different chemicals in the blood such as sodium, potassium, glucose, and calcium. Immunoassay methods use antibody or antigen recognition to detect complex molecules and provide information related to infectious diseases, hormone levels, cardiac risk factors, cancer, thyroid issues, and therapeutic drugs. The system was designed over a period of eight years by a team of more than one hundred people led by human factors engineer Ila Elson and human factors and design validation team members Tony Bonilla, Bill Muto, Raj Patel, John-Paul Stephens, and Elvira Weis.


Award cochair Stan Caplan commented, "This is a complex product, and I like the way they took a systems approach to the interaction design rather than looking separately at the components."


Centrella is a best-in-class medical-surgical bed featuring a number of innovations to improve the patient experience and reduce the risk of patient harm. These include an advanced night light to help patients navigate a dark room, a sensor to detect heart and respiration rates, an overhead arm to mount patients' electronic devices for easy viewing, and a moisture sensor to detect and automatically notify caregivers of incontinence events. Centrella also offers a comprehensive GUI that enable caregivers to execute complex commands and view detailed patient information, a built-in scale to weigh bedridden patients, and a powered air surface to reduce patients' risk of developing pressure injuries. Centrella was developed by a team of designers led by HF/E research scientist Neal Wiggermann and industrial design engineer Mark Zerhusen.


Summarizing the judges' findings, Caplan noted, "The Centrella team did a great job of identifying and addressing the many types of interactions that caregivers and patients of all sizes could have with the bed."


Submissions were judged on six criteria: functional obviousness, ease of operation, creativity/innovation, concept development, design, and evaluation.


View information about past award recipients at http://tg.hfes.org/pdtg/awards.htm. The Call for Nominations for the 2018 award will be announced early next year.
 

 
 

Public Policy Matters

Congress Passes Continuing Resolution to Avoid Government Shutdown

By Lewis-Burke Associates LLC


Congress has passed, and the president has signed, a continuing resolution (CR) that will continue to fund the federal government through December 8, avoiding a government shutdown. The legislation also includes $15.3 billion in emergency disaster funding as an initial installment of aid for Texas to respond to the damage caused by Hurricane Harvey; suspends the statutory debt limit also through December 8, primarily to allow the federal government to borrow money for emergency disaster relief from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma; and extends the National Flood Insurance Program, which was set to expire on September 30. The bill passed with broad bipartisan support with a Senate vote of 80–17 and a House vote of 316–90.
 

The CR will fund federal agencies and programs at essentially fiscal year (FY) 2017 funding levels. However, the CR requires a 0.7% across-the-board cut for all federal agencies and programs as a result of overall spending caps set by law, known as sequestration. This may mean that federal agencies could reduce some research grant funding amounts for the length of the CR. The resolution makes clear that federal agencies cannot start new programs or projects but also cannot terminate or withhold funds for any programs or projects previously funded and supported by Congress.


To prepare for negotiations on the remainder of FY 2018, both the House and Senate continue to work on FY 2018 appropriations bills. The House is expected to complete work on an omnibus bill that includes all 12 appropriations bills by the end of the week of September 15. Meanwhile, the Senate Appropriations Committee expects to complete the remaining four appropriations bills by the end of September. A budget agreement that raises the overall FY 2018 spending caps is still needed to complete an omnibus bill. Without such an agreement, the only other alternative is a full-year CR with $5 billion in across-the-board cuts applied to federal agencies and programs as a result of sequestration.


The White House press release announcing the signing of the bill is available at https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/09/08/president-donald-j-trump-signs-hr-601-law.



Lewis-Burke Associates LLC, a leading Washington, D.C.-based government relations and consulting firm, represents the public policy interests of scientific societies and institutions of higher education. Lewis-Burke's staff of government relations professionals works to promote the federal research and policy goals of HFES and the HF/E community.
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

Hurricanes Not Affecting Annual Meeting

Inquiries have been made regarding whether the Annual Meeting venue in Austin has been affected by the recent hurricanes and flooding in Texas. Happily, the meeting has not been affected and is proceeding on schedule. The thoughts of HFES members and staff are with everyone who has been affected by recent hurricanes in the Southeast, and those who need to cancel their Annual Meeting attendance due to the hurricanes and their aftermath will have cancellation fees waived.
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

Keynote Address: Policing Reform Versus Police Reform

            Ronald L. Davis

Ronald L. Davis will present the 2017 keynote address on Tuesday, October 10. Policing in the United States is unique in that it is neither centralized, as is the case in many countries, nor does it fall under the direct control of the federal government. Each of the approximately 18,000 local, state, and tribal law enforcement agencies in the nation falls under the control of a local governing body, executive, or elected official(s). Local control is arguably one of the key characteristics that makes the American policing system unique. It is also the characteristic that presents the greatest challenge to establishing standardized ethical and professional practices within a system few deny is in need of reform.

 

Yet the discussion of police reform seems to focus primarily on individual officer behavior and ignores the operational systems that have an even greater impact on policing outcomes. Management guru William Edward Deming captured this notion through his 85/15 rule, which states that 85% of the problems in any organization are system related, whereas only 15% are worker related.
 

Davis will explain that if the United States is to achieve real and sustainable reform in law enforcement, the focus must shift from the police (those individuals sworn to uphold the law) to policing systems (the policies, practices, and culture of police organizations). As a former police chief and director of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, Davis will discuss how focusing on "rogue" officers rather than the operational systems in which they operate is counterproductive to effective reform efforts. He will also outline what specific systems must change, why they must change, and how that change can and must occur, especially in the 21st century.
 

Ronald L. Davis was appointed by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to serve as director of the DOJ's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) from 2013 to 2017. The COPS Office is responsible for advancing community policing nationwide and manages over $1.2 billion in federal grants to support the community policing activities for approximately 18,000 local, state, and tribal law enforcement agencies.


In December 2014, President Barack Obama appointed Director Davis to serve as executive director of the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing. President Obama charged Davis and the task force with developing concrete recommendations to improve community trust in the police while enhancing public safety. The final report of the task force serves as a foundational document in American policing.


Prior to serving as COPS Director, Davis had a distinguished career in law enforcement, serving more than eight years as Chief of Police of East Palo Alto, California, and 20 years with the Oakland, California, Police Department. Davis was recognized for his innovative community policing efforts and for working collaboratively with the community to dramatically reduce crime and violence in a city once named as the murder capital of the United States.
 

Davis served as a member of the prestigious Harvard University and National Institute of Justice Executive Sessions on Policing and Public Safety. He also served as a policing expert for DOJ on several "pattern and practices" investigations and on two federal monitoring teams with oversight of police reform agreements/consent decrees between the DOJ and the Washington, D.C., and Detroit Police Departments.
 

Davis is coauthor of Race and Policing: An Agenda for Action, Exploring the Role of the Police in Prisoner Reentry, and the DOJ publication, How to Correctly Collect and Analyze Racial Profiling Data: Your Reputation Depends on It.
 

Davis possesses a bachelor's degree from Southern Illinois University and has completed the Senior Executives in State and Local Government Program at Harvard University Kennedy School of Government. He is a principal consultant at 21st Century Policing Solutions, LLC.
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

PDTG Invited Speaker to Address Trust in Artificial Intelligence

              Douglas Lenat

On Wednesday, October 11, from 2:00–3:30 p.m., learn about trust in artificial intelligence (AI)-driven products from Product Design Technical Group invited speaker Douglas Lenat.

 

According to Lenat, "Almost everyone who talks about AI nowadays means neural-net-based machine learning from big data. That fast pattern finding and pattern using is a lot like what our right-brain hemispheres do. It enables AIs to react quickly and – often – adequately. But human beings also have a left-brain hemisphere, which reasons more slowly, logically, and causally. Human beings' superpower is harnessing both types of reasoning, and I believe that the most powerful AI solutions in the coming decade will likewise be hybrids of right-brain-like thinking fast and left-brain-like thinking slow."
 

Lenat will discuss ability (versus inability) to rationalize decisions, which he believes will make near-future AI systems such as autonomous cars, household robots, automated assistants, and AI-powered social media far more trusted and far more trustworthy. Methods AI has developed for this sort of symbolic representation and automated reasoning, progress over the last several decades, and the current state of the art will be recapped.


Lenat received his PhD in computer science from Stanford University, where he investigated automated discovery based on "interestingness" heuristics, for which he received the 1977 IJCAI Computers and Thought Award. Besides serving as a professor at Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford, he was principal scientist at MCC, where he founded the Cyc Project in 1984 – something he dubbed ontological engineering. At the end of 1994, he founded Cycorp, where he continues to serve as CEO. Lenat is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, and the Cognitive Science Society. He is an editor of the Journal of Automated Reasoning, Journal of Learning Sciences, and Journal of Applied Ontology. He is a founder and advisory board member of TTI Vanguard and is the only individual to have served on the scientific advisory boards of both Microsoft and Apple.
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

Book Your Room by September 19 and Save

The Annual Meeting is coming up in less than a month, and nearly 90% of the rooms at the special HFES rate have been reserved. Please be sure to book your hotel room before the discount cutoff date of September 19. It's hard to beat the HFES rate of $232/night for single or double occupancy in a hotel with the important amenities you need to take full advantage of the Annual Meeting. And you help HFES keep registration costs reasonable when you stay in the headquarters hotel.

 


 

Annual Meeting

Hot-Topic Plenary Session Recap

HFES is pleased to offer these three dedicated sessions, from 8:00 to 9:00 a.m., featuring distinguished speakers addressing the HF/E aspects of timely topics.


Wednesday: Applying Human-Systems Integration to America's Policing System, organized with the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the NASEM Board on Human-Systems Integration. SIOP President Fred Oswald will introduce Ronald L. Davis, consultant, 21st Century Policing.


Thursday: Human Factors Engineering Can Prevent the Next Major Incident in the Oil and Gas Industry, with invited speakers M. Sam Mannan (Texas A&M U.), Liz McDaniel (Huntsman Corp.), and Johan Hendrikse (Shell NA Advisor for the Americas).


Friday: Beyond Gamification: From Here to Affinity, presented by James Paul Gee, Arizona State U.
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

RSVP for the Women's Mentoring and Networking Lunch

By Ashley Hughes, University of Illinois at Chicago; Beth Blickensderfer, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University; Gabriella M. Hancock, California State University, Long Beach; Tracy Sanders, MITRE Corporation; and Nadia Doutcheva, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Are you interested in expanding your network of women colleagues? Do you enjoy trading career stories, learning from other women, and making new friends? If so, please join us for the HFES Women's Professional Networking lunch on Thursday, October 12, 12:30–1:45 p.m. at Max's Wine Dive, located near the JW Marriott Austin. We expect a mix of professionals from academia, industry, and government, as well as students. A short program during lunch will provide a special welcome from Carol Stuart-Buttle, engage attendees in discussions, and highlight the importance of mentorship.


We have worked with HFES to offer a special price of $15 for those who RSVP. Please read the event details and respond so that we can include you at the discounted rate.


Reserve your spot by clicking the following link by September 27: https://goo.gl/forms/feQWq4XKFek4vAXG2.


If you experience any problems or have questions, please contact us at hfewomensgroup@gmail.com.


We will confirm your reservation by e-mail and look forward to seeing you there!
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

Join the Discussion on the Future of the Women's Group

By Ashley Hughes, University of Illinois at Chicago; Beth Blickensderfer, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University; Gabriella M. Hancock, California State University, Long Beach; Tracy Sanders, MITRE Corporation; and Nadia Doutcheva, University of Wisconsin-Madison


It takes a village to start a new group or effort. We would love to get your perspective, input, and help on organizing future events to promote networking and mentorship. A limited number of professionals and students attending the Annual Meeting are welcome to attend an informal meeting and discussion in the Birds of a Feather meeting room on Tuesday, October 10, from 1:30–3:00 p.m.


Please join us to share your ideas for future events/forums/formats for the women's group! If you have an idea or would like to join, let us know by providing us with your name and contact information at https://goo.gl/forms/W1eAIum98SomZuy02.
 

 
 

Other News

Request for Proposals: APA Interdisciplinary Conference

Scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students are invited to participate in the American Psychological Association's interdisciplinary conference on Technology, Mind, and Society, which will take place in Washington, DC, on April 5–7, 2018.

Papers, symposia, and posters based on the following broad themes are invited:

  • Basic research: How humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research, and related topics.

  • Foundations of technology design: Development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research.

  • Applications: Development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace.

  • Broader implications: Ethical and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions.

The deadline for submissions is October 20, 2017. Submissions can be made here.