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June 13, 2016

Inside HFES

Update from the Board on Human-Systems Integration
By Pascale Carayon, Past HFES Liaison to BOHSI


A Student Perspective on the HFES Executive Council Meeting
By Trey Roady, Texas A&M University, Human Factors & Cognitive Systems Lab


m-Health App Award Presented to Srinivas and Jia

Annual Meeting

Request Space for Special Meetings at the Annual Meeting

Promote the Work of Your University Lab at HFES 2016

Public Policy Matters

Congressional Update: HFES Cosponsors Briefing on Autonomous Systems and the Role of the Human
By Lewis-Burke Associates LLC

Standards News

U.S. Technical Advisory Group to ISO for TC159/SC3 Annual Meeting

Member Milestones

In Memoriam: Daniel L. Welch, Jr.

Other News

Application Deadline Extended for Jahns Student Practitioner Award

 
 

Inside HFES

Update from the Board on Human-Systems Integration

By Pascale Carayon, Past HFES Liaison to BOHSI


This article summarizes the origin and purpose of BOHSI (http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/bohsi/index.htm) and details some of its current and future projects.
 

History
The Committee on Human Factors was established under the auspices of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine in 1980 at the request of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. From an initial roster of 11, more than 80 distinguished experts have served as volunteer members of the committee, including members of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and National Academy of Medicine. HFES members have also played a prominent role through the years.


As the field has grown and the needs of the federal government have changed, the expertise and activities of the committee have likewise evolved and adapted. In 2008, the group was renamed the Committee on Human-Systems Integration to better reflect the broader applicability of human factors issues, including nonmilitary and health systems. In 2010, after 30 years of outstanding work by its predecessors, the committee was repositioned as the Board on Human-Systems Integration.


Below is a roster of BOHSI's current members:

  • Nancy Cooke, PhD, Chair, Arizona State University

  • Ellen Bass, PhD, Drexel University

  • Pascale Carayon, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • Sara Czaja, PhD, University of Miami

  • Frank Durso, PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology

  • Andrew Imada, PhD, A. S. Imada and Associates

  • Edmond Israelski, PhD, AbbVie Inc.

  • Elizabeth Loftus, PhD (NAS), University of California, Irvine

  • Frederick Oswald, PhD, Rice University

  • Karl Pister, PhD (NAE), Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz

  • David Rempel, MD, MPH, University of California, Berkeley

  • Emilie Roth, PhD, Roth Cognitive Engineering

  • Barbara Silverstein, PhD, Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

  • David Wegman, MD, MSc, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Mission
BOHSI has a broad mandate that includes providing new perspectives on theoretical and methodological issues concerning the relationship of individuals and organizations to technology and the environment; identifying critical issues in the design, test, evaluation, and use of new human-centered technologies; and advising the federal government, Congress, and relevant nonfederal entities on the research needed to expand the scientific and technical bases for designing technology to support the needs of its users.


Since its inception, the board and the ad hoc study committees operating under its oversight have issued more than 50 reports on topics such as:

  • scientific and technology challenges of virtual reality

  • research needs for human factors

  • mental models of human-computer interaction

  • nuclear safety

  • the future of air traffic control

  • the effects of musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace

  • the case for human factors in industry and government

  • HSI in the system development process

  • human factors and home health care.

BOHSI project reports (PDF) may be downloaded free of charge from http://sites.nationalacademies.org/DBASSE/BOHSI/Reports/index.htm.


Activities
BOHSI's highest-profile activities are its biannual meetings. Open sessions at these meetings provide board members, sponsoring agency staff, and guests with opportunities to, among other things, discuss current issues in human-systems integration, hear presentations by invited researchers and policy makers, place scientific knowledge concerning HSI in a public policy framework to make it accessible to the policy community, and highlight topics of current concern that might warrant in-depth study by an ad hoc panel of experts to be appointed by the Academies and to operate under the oversight of BOHSI.


Throughout the year the board engages in such activities as leading or participating in sessions at professional meetings (see below), producing research and policy papers, convening additional public conferences and workshops with presentations by noted experts to raise awareness and identify critical technical and policy issues in the HSI area, and overseeing work of various ad hoc studies pursuing critical and timely topics related to HSI.


Current Projects
Research Methodologies and Statistical Approaches to Understanding Driver Fatigue Factors in Motor Carrier Safety and Driver Health (consensus study; sponsored by Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration). An ad hoc panel conducted a study to assess the state of knowledge about the relationship of such factors as hours of driving, hours on duty, and periods of rest to the fatigue experienced by truck and bus drivers while driving and the implications for the safe operation of their vehicles. The panel also assessed the relationship of these factors to drivers' health over the longer term. It identified improvements in data and research methods that can lead to better understanding in both areas.


Based on its review and deliberations, the panel issued a report, which is available at no charge from the Web site above.


Workforce-Planning Models for Forensic Science (workshop; sponsored by National Institute of Standards and Technology). An effective workforce-planning model for the forensic sciences should include identifying prospective examiners with the right blend of cognitive/perceptual skills and education, and a plan to follow up hiring decisions with a rigorous agenda for on-the-job training. However, few efforts have been made to examine how these variables can be factored into a workforce-planning model effectively when identifying the right candidate for the job in a fair and nondiscriminatory manner. Several critical questions still remain regarding the optimal skill set for candidates and on-the-job training needs for prospective forensic examiners.


An ad hoc steering committee under BOHSI oversight will conduct a two-day workshop on July 14 and 15 in Washington, DC, to identify and discuss the skill sets for individuals who seek to gain entry into forensic science careers. The workshop will involve a rigorous examination of workforce-planning models for the field of forensic science and will consider the balance between candidates' cognitive skills, education, and the ability to interact with workplace technologies, and the relevance of these variables to workforce planning. The workshop will be webcast live, and the recording will be made available on the Academies Web site for access after the workshop concludes. A workshop report is expected to be issued by November 2016. More details may be found at http://sites.nationalacademies.org/DBASSE/BOHSI/CurrentProjects/DBASSE_169014.


BOHSI recently received funding for two new projects: An expert meeting titled "Analysis of FAA Staffing Models" from the Federal Aviation Administration; and a consensus study titled "Performance-Based Safety Regulation" from the Department of Transportation (in collaboration with the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies).


Annual Meeting Panel
Plan to attend BOHSI's discussion panel at the HFES Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, on Tuesday, September 21, from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m., "Human Factors in the Federal Government: Opportunities to Improve Human Performance." The purpose of this panel is to highlight activities in the federal government of interest to HFES members, specifically in the broadly defined area of forensic sciences (i.e., error mitigation). The panel includes representation from a number of federal agencies. Additionally, given the prominent role of human factors/ergonomics in the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Department of Justice forensic science initiative, HFES members will be able to learn how policy relevant to the HF/E community is created at federal funding agencies.
 

 
 

Inside HFES

A Student Perspective on the HFES Executive Council Meeting

By Trey Roady, Texas A&M University, Human Factors & Cognitive Systems Lab


In April, I had the pleasure to serve as a student observer at the HFES Executive Council meeting and to provide a student perspective on current initiatives. I got to see for myself how our Society's major policies and initiatives are shaped.


For a student taking his first professional steps, the Executive Council can seem mysterious and distant. When you're there in person, you see the truth that HFES is run by members who are united in their dedication to make sure that we provide invaluable service to our community, both nationally and internationally. We also are fortunate to have the dedication of singularly talented staff members who coordinate all of the details.


The Executive Council has a long-term vision that emphasizes a national role of technical leadership. They've been connecting with, lobbying, and educating regulators and legislators at the federal level to ensure that HF/E is given the opportunity to contribute to future guidelines and that funding initiatives consider our unique expertise. Future professionals and academics can be confident that not only will their work protect people, but also that it will meet with the level of regard that it is due. Additionally, our role in translational research helps legislators understand the socially beneficial role of the "softer" sciences and provides a concrete example for how cognitive studies directly impact society.


However, all of our detailed plans and programs will not have an impact if we, as a Society, do not provide the motivating force to make them succeed. While the Executive Council is creating new committees to improve engagement and diversity by identifying potential leaders, the younger members of our Society, such as myself, must take on some of the responsibility to make HFES into an organization that will continue to be a credit to our profession. We cannot view the Society as some edifice with which we interact; we have to recognize that it is the result of all of our individual interactions and contributions, even the small ones. To get the most out of our membership, we have to contribute just as much as, or more than, we take away.


The future strength of HFES lies in forging strong connections between local and regional chapters and providing a solid support framework so that we can, in turn, provide the kind of translational research and applications that society needs.


If HFES has a strength, it's in the core membership that truly makes us a Society. In my few years as a member, I've been regularly struck by the enthusiasm our established members demonstrate for the field and connect with our younger members. It's this very quality that I think has provided us much of our historical success.


People stay in organizations for people. Although there are other benefits for joining, which are important for providing value, the real role of a professional society is to connect the experiences of its members so that they can collaborate. If we will persist and thrive, it will be because of our connections with one another.


Trey Roady is a PhD precandidate in interdisciplinary engineering, advised by Thomas Ferris, and a member of the Human Factors & Cognitive Systems lab. He graduated from Texas A&M in 2012 with a BS in industrial engineering. He serves as the outgoing president of the Texas A&M Student Chapter and is active in the Houston Chapter.
 

 
 

Inside HFES

m-Health App Award Presented to Srinivas and Jia

At the 2016 International Symposium on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care, Preethi Srinivas and Yuan Jia from Indiana University's School of Informatics and Computing received the top honors in this year's Student Mobile Health Applications for Consumers Design Competition. The award, for their app, "LookUp – Away From Mobile for Good," comes with a $1,000 prize.
 

According to the recipients, "LookUp introduces a mobile and persuasive solution whereby individuals can self-monitor their smartphone usage, decide when and how they want to spend more time enjoying the real world with their loved ones — all while investing in, and giving back to, the community in a fun manner. LookUp uses a business model whereby advertisers pay to display their company's advertisement after the completion of every smartphone-free period, and charity organizations capitalize on the times when users decide to go smartphone-free. We expect this model to drive a sustainable product design for today's tech market."
 

The contest objectives are to showcase the application of HF/E methods and design principles into the concept and design of a mobile health smartphone application for consumers, and how the HF/E approach to such an application can lead to a useful, usable, and satisfying user experience while simultaneously improving patient outcomes such as knowledge, safety, or adherence.
 

The judges selected three finalists prior to the symposium, who gave presentations on their apps. Besides Srinivas and Jia, the other finalists were

  • Maithili Bade and Arian Haffezi, San Jose State University, with their app, "Holistic Medication Management (Hmm)"

  • Antonia Aguilar, Tiffany McKinley, Gowa Wu, & Tiffany H. Young, San Jose State University, for "Vital"

Rupa Valdez and Anthony D. (Tony) Andre chaired the judging committee. The judging team to narrow all applicants to three finalists included Kristi Bauerly, Kapil Madathil, Robert Schumacher, Chloe Markley, Kaden Rushford, Sahiti Myneni, Raj Ratwani, Dustin Hatfield, Vanessa Martinez, Nicole Werner, and Yushi Yang. The judges for the finalists at the symposium were Joy Rivera, Joseph Cafazzo, and Laura Barg-Walkow.
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

Request Space for Special Meetings at the Annual Meeting

Groups that wish to conduct special meetings at the 2016 Annual Meeting are invited to submit requests for meeting space. Generally, meetings will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis; however, priority is given to meetings that are open to all interested attendees. Meetings that are open to all members and attendees will be listed in the final program, which is distributed at the meeting.


To request a meeting time and space, contact HFES Executive Director Lynn Strother (lynn@hfes.org).
 

 
 

Annual Meeting

Promote the Work of Your University Lab at HFES 2016

HFES invites posters from university laboratories that are conducting work in HF/E research and application. The aim of this showcase is to demonstrate the variety of HF/E educational and research programs, not to describe specific research projects.


University lab posters may be attended by lab representatives or left unattended. There is no proceedings paper associated with lab displays. Each lab (or school, if multiple labs from the same school wish to display a poster) is allocated a single side of a poster board that measures 4 feet high by 8 feet wide. Posters must not exceed those dimensions.


All lab and technical posters will be presented during a special posters reception on Tuesday, September 20, from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. in the Exhibit Hall. A total of 14 spaces are available.
 

To reserve space to display your university's HF/E lab, send a request to Susan Marschner (susan@hfes.org) at the HFES central office by August 2 and include the following information:

  • Name of lab and university

  • Name, phone number, and e-mail address of person responsible for the poster

  • Brief description of the lab

Space will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Confirmation and instructions for displaying your lab poster will be sent via e-mail.
 

 
 

Public Policy Matters

Congressional Update: HFES Cosponsors Briefing on Autonomous Systems and the Role of the Human

By Lewis-Burke Associates LLC

 

On May 31, HFES, along with the American Psychological Association, Duke University, Texas A&M University, and Arizona State University, cosponsored "Autonomous Systems and the Role of the Human," a congressional briefing on team science and human factors. The briefing included remarks by HFES members Nancy Cooke, HFES president-elect and professor and program chair of Human Systems Engineering at Arizona State University; Missy Cummings, associate professor and director of the Humans and Autonomy Laboratory at Duke University; and Robin Murphy, Raytheon Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M. Barbara Wanchisen, director of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, provided an introduction to team science and to the National Academies report on the subject.

 

The speakers addressed issues on the public perception of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), regulation and accountability, human-machine interface with autonomous systems, and the diverse functionality of UAVs. Murphy, an engineering professor with extensive experience in emergency response, noted that these vehicles can be invaluable in surveying the effects of disasters such as Hurricane Katrina, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and coastal flooding. However, Murphy also noted that much still must be done to improve the effectiveness of these technologies. The briefing was well attended by both House and Senate staff and was a great opportunity to bring attention to the work being done by HFES members.


Lewis-Burke Associates LLC, a leading Washington, D.C.-based government relations and consulting firm, represents the public policy interests of scientific societies and institutions of higher education. Lewis-Burke's staff of about 20 government relations professionals work to promote the federal research and policy goals of HFES and the HF/E community.
 

 
 

Standards News

U.S. Technical Advisory Group to ISO for TC159/SC3 Annual Meeting

The U.S. Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to ISO for TC159/SC3 (Anthropometry and Biomechanics) will hold its annual meeting at Anthrotech in Yellow Springs, Ohio, from July 14 to 15. The meeting is open to the public. Please contact SC3 TAG chair Bob Fox (robert.r.fox@gm.com) for more information.
 

 
 

Member Milestones

In Memoriam: Daniel L. Welch, Jr.

        Daniel L. Welch, Jr.

Daniel L. Welch, Jr., PhD, CPE, passed away on December 21, 2015, at his home in Silver Spring, Maryland. He is survived by his sons, Robert and Dennis; four grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren. He received a bachelor's degree from Seton Hall University, a master's degree from Towson State College, and master's and doctoral degrees in applied experimental psychology (human factors) from The Catholic University of America.


Welch was an engineering psychologist who applied general systems theory to the human factors engineering analysis, design, test and evaluation, and operation of complex systems. He strove to design systems that people could operate efficiently, effectively, safely, and rewardingly. He participated in the design of nuclear power plant control rooms, nuclear submarine control party stations, aviation navigation and communications systems, and complex computer interfaces. He served as principal human factors engineer for TetraTech AMT, a technical assistance contractor for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. In addition operating his own consulting practice, Welch also worked with Carlow International, SAIC, and the Andrulis Research Corporation. He was a Fellow of the British Institute for Human Factors and Ergonomics and a former chair of the HFES Public Interest Committee.


Notes Steve Mulloy, "Dr. Dan Welch was my employee at Tetra Tech here in Rosslyn, Virginia. I worked very closely with Dan, as he was my subject matter expert in human factors supporting our contract with the FAA. I would frequently stop by his office and chat with him about all kinds of things; he had a wealth of knowledge and was full of wisdom. As our friendship grew, I came to realize Dan was a brilliant, kind, and caring man. I learned a lot from him, and he helped me and my team on many opportunities. He frequently spoke about his family, and I know he cared very much about them very much."


Frank Lacson
Chair, System Development Technical Group

 

(Content was extracted from obituaries at the Washington Post and the Pumphrey Funeral Home.)

 


 

Other News

Application Deadline Extended for Jahns Student Practitioner Award

The deadline to apply for the Dieter W. Jahns Student Practitioner Award has been extended to July 15, 2016. This annual award is given to a student (or a group of students) for an ergonomics project that demonstrates the major practice areas of ergonomics: analysis, design, and evaluation. The award is open worldwide to students (MS or PhD) in ergonomics and ergonomics-related programs.


In addition to the award, there is a $1,000 prize. The award and cash prize will be presented during the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, September 19–23, 2016, in Washington, DC. An added bonus from HFES is free registration for the Annual Meeting.


Students who have completed their graduate degrees in the past year are also eligible. Go to www.ergofoundation.org for complete details on criteria and format. Send submissions by e-mail to Robert J. Smillie (robert.smillie@cox.net).